The Mary Pickford Cocktail

America’s Sweetheart was, apparently, fond of the occasional tipple. Her husband, Douglas Fairbanks, was not. I guess you need to be sober to somersault off buildings and fight pirates.  Of course, Fairbanks did… Continue reading

Drink because you are happy, but never because you are miserable–G.K. Chesterton

I’ve Never Met Napoleon, but I plan to Find the Time: The Napoleon Cocktail

The fist time I saw Abel Gance’s 1927 silent film “Napoleon,” I was not thinking much about cocktails that bore his name.  Cocktails, beyond a gin and tonic or a Long Island Iced… Continue reading

The Sherman

The Sherman Cocktail is another one from the Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book and is an inverted riff on the good ol’ Manhattan Cocktail, but with a few surprises. In this case, the vermouth… Continue reading

Vermouth’s Lament

Vermouth, like gin, seems to be one of those ingredients that many people do not like. Or understand.  And since they do not understand it they chase it about the village wielding torches… Continue reading

“Shake me up, Judy!” Martinis Part Two

The martini is the quintessential cocktail. It has captured the world’s attention like no other. As such, it should be shown the respect it so rightly deserves.  Back in the day when someone… Continue reading

Don’t F#%k With My Martini

I will do my very best not to use my trusty soapbox, but I will still keep it close by in case I need it. The concoctions that most “martini” bars foist onto… Continue reading

A Sweet Dance of Love: The Tango Cocktail

    To be accurate, it is the Tango #2 and comes from the The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book printed in 1935. During its heyday, the bar at the “Hyphen”—as the Waldorf-Astoria was… Continue reading

Size Matters: Presidente Cocktail

Go into your typical chain restaurant bar and order a drink and it comes in a glass as big as your head. Go to craft cocktail bar and you can hold the glass… Continue reading

Genevieve Lantelme

Why is there not a cocktail named after this woman? Well, it’s probably because she was French, cocktails were American, and she tragically died young before the cocktail really took off in Europe. Still,… Continue reading

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